Tag Archive for 'Peru'

Lomo Saltado

Lomo7

Lomo Saltado

This is a wonderful Peruvian dish that has delicious Asian undertones. Beef sirloin strips are cooked in vinegar, soy sauce and spices, then stir fried with red onions, cilantro and tomatoes. Like many good Peruvian dishes, two carbs are necessary with this meal, rice and French fried potatoes. This was one of my favorite dishes that Rosa used to prepare. When she came ‘home’ for the holidays I couldn’t wait to make it with her. I can highly recommend this multicultural dish. One try and you’ll be hooked!

Ingredients

2 lb (approximately 6 pieces) of beef sirloin

2 tsps garlic salt

1 tsp pepper

4 TBS oil, used in 1 TBS increments per directions

4 medium sized tomatoes, vine ripened

2 large red onions, thick chopped

½ cup soy sauce

1 TBS oyster sauce (optional)

2 TBS red wine vinegar

¼ cup cilantro, chopped

1 ½ bags of frozen French Fries, cooked according to package directions

3 cups of uncooked white rice, cooked according to package directions

Directions

This recipe is very straight forward. That said, the two steps that can be a little tricky are (1) timing the rice and French Fries to be ready at the same time as the main dish and (2) cooking the meat in two batches as to ensure that it does not become overcooked.

Cook rice and French Fries according to package directions. If all of the Lomo Saltado ingredients are prepared to be cooked, the dish will take approximately 15 minutes to cook.

Cut the onions, first in half, once horizontally and 4 times vertical (big pieces) to end up with thick chopped onion wedges. Prepare the tomatoes similarly.

Slice the meat stir fry style, ensuring the pieces are uniform in size for even cooking. Add garlic salt and pepper.

In a large pan add 1 TBS oil on medium high heat. When the oil is very hot add half the quantity of meat. Stir regularly and when cooked, add the soy sauce, oyster sauce, vinegar and set aside covered while the second batch of meat is prepared. Cook second batch of meat, set aside and cover to keep warm.

(This is a good time to check the timing on the rice and fries. If needed, hold on finishing this next step until rice and potatoes are ready.)

In the same pan add oil and the onions, cook stirring regularly for at least 2-3 minutes. Add the tomatoes for another 2 minutes, then return the meat to the pan to heat for approximately one minute. Add the cilantro and serve over white rice with French Fries.

It’s A Pisco Party

A delightful alternative pisco beverage

A dlightful alternative pisco beverage

I have the honor of being the celebratory guest blogger for my good Twitter pal and birthday gal Iliana Ewen. That in mind, this drink comes with wishes for another great year ahead. Should she wish to hide from her special day, this tasty beverage is certain to erase her memory when combined with laughter, friends, family and a bit of cake!

Three years ago, I met a young gal from Peru named Rosa. We became friends and through that friendship she introduced me to all things Peruvian. While the cuisine is amongst my favorites I must also confess that I have often indulged in the native alcohol — pisco [prounced PEES-KO]. You should know, I have a soft spot for both Rosa and pisco. These two key instigators blended with my Italian heritage are responsible for this seemingly innocent concoction.

But like all bar drinks, this one must have an interesting story and that story is rooted in the origins of pisco.

Pisco- Drinkology 101- facts to impress your friends while under the influence:
– Pisco is both a city and an important port on the Peruvian coast.
– The name originates from the Inca word for a ‘bird’
– Pisco is made from a special grape in the Andes Mountains and dates back to the 1500s
– It is a South American brandy-like liqueur distilled from grapes and is 45% alcohol
– Both Chile and Peru claim pisco as their national drink and are still fighting over who has sole ownership (Rosa says it is Peru that owns it!)
– Most common pisco drink is a pisco sour (but that’s a whole ‘nother story!)

In conclusion, pisco is some serious stuff.

Lemon-Aid Blur
Note Secret Measurement: 2 parts liquid K.O. Be sure to read over both ingredients lists.

Lemon Simple Syrup Ingredients

1 cup sugar
1 cup water
12 strips of lemon zest (approx 2 lemons)

Lemon Simple Syrup Directions

Use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (or peel) off of lemons before juicing them as directed in the remainder of the drink recipe (called The Blur- see below).
In small saucepan, on medium-high heat mix together sugar, water and zest. Stir occasionally until sugar dissolves. Let stand 20 minutes, until cool. Syrup can be refrigerated up to one week – and is also good over berry flavored sorbets.

The Blur Ingredients

¾ cup lemon simple syrup
¼ cup pisco (or ouzo), chilled
½ cup + 1 TBS fresh lemon juice
4 lemons
6 sprigs basil (or mint for the less adventurous)
ice, crushed

The Blur Directions

Stir together the simple syrup, pisco (or ouzo), and the fresh lemon juice.
Fill six small glasses with ice, fill to the brim and add a sprig of basil.